CNN/Kaiser Poll: Majority of White Working-Class Evangelicals Might Vote for Donald Trump

Donald Trump
(Photo : Gage Skidmore/Flickr/CC) A CNN/Kaiser poll showed that a majority of white working-class evangelicals support Donald Trump.

A poll conducted by the CNN/Kaiser Family Foundation showed that a majority (76 percent) of the white working-class evangelicals would consider voting for Donald Trump.

Additionally, the poll found that as many as 89 percent of the working-class white evangelicals think that Christian values are under attack in the U.S. They are followed by mainline Protestants (73 percent), Catholics (61 percent), and people with no religious preference (41 percent), who hold the same opinion.

According to the poll, about 48 percent of evangelical Christians, 39 percent of mainline Protestants, and 28 percent Catholics say that diversity threatens American culture.

Trump has promised to repeal the Johnson Amendment which prohibits churches and religious organizations from endorsing politics or political candidates.

"I feel the country was founded on Christian principles. They came here to get away form being persecuted for their beliefs. And now, if our ministers don't marry a gay couple or refuse to marry a gay couple, they can be arrested and taken to jail," Sandra Long, a resident of Pennsylvania state told CNN.

About 70 percent of white working-class evangelicals said that immigrants from Latin American countries were "good, honest" people, but were skeptical on how immigration impacts crime and jobs.

Good paying jobs (30 percent), trade (18 percent), taxes (17 percent), government regulation (12 percent), and income gap (11 percent) were some of the major concerns of white working-class Trump supporters.

A majority of people irrespective of whether they support Trump (79 percent) or don't (61 percent) think that trade agreements have taken jobs away from the U.S.

The random survey on 1,614 working-class whites was carried out by the CNN/Kaiser Family Foundation between August 9 and September 5, via telephone.

The study teams define "working class" as those individuals who have not attained a 4-year college degree.

Tags CNN/Kaiser Family Foundation Poll, White working-class evangelicals

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